All Ratings and Reviews for Scot D Brown

Ratings

Bad
Overall 4.2
Good
Hard
Easiness of class 2.7
Easy
Heavy
Workload 2.5
Light
Not Clear
Clarity of professor 3.8
Clear
Not Helpful
Helpfulness of professor 4.5
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Reviews

HIST M150D Submitted April 7, 2014 Grade Received: N/A

A very fun & informative class! Professor Brown is one of the best lecturers on campus. He makes so many insightful points about a broad spectrum of American life that surrounded the music, which really brings a deeper level of analysis than most music history classes have.

Like the review below said, there's 2 Midterm tests & a final paper. For the midterm ID's, make sure you write down as much information as you remember, regardless of what the recommended page length is, and you'll get a great grade. The final paper is easy to write because it's on a music topic that YOU choose. Make a strong thesis argument, then use lyrical analysis and/or sound analysis to back it up.

HIST M150D Submitted March 15, 2014 Grade Received: N/A

I recently took Afro AM 150 with Professor Scot Brown. Take this professor! Honestly he is more concerned with your grasp of the material, therefore the tests and essays are not that difficult.

There are 4 Components of the class:

1)Discussion section: You are required to post 2 questions per week, based on the assigned readings. The section expands on assigned readings so it is very useful, especially when it comes time for the midterms.
2)1st Midterm. There are 8 given terms and you have to choose 4 of them to define. The terms will be things like Ray Charles, James Brown, Soul Music in relation to the Black Power movement etc.
3)2nd Midterm. Same amount of questions. Terms like Soul Train, Chaka Khan Disco etc. Overall midterms are doable if you got to lectures. Honestly all readings do not need to be done because they can be repetitive and go into more detail than needed.
4)Final paper. 6-8 pages, only 1 mandatory source. You pick the artist, song, concert etc you want to talk about.
For example, I am writing about rap music being a misogynistic genre and relating that to the construction of the Black female rapper. Then I will incorporate readings.

HIST M151C Submitted April 4, 2011 Grade Received: N/A

I had Intro to Afro-Am History with Professor Brown and truly did enjoy myself. He has a very engaging teaching style that will keep you interested in every lecture. Fortunately or unfortunately (depending on who your TA is), the grading is left solely up to the TA. As long as you go to a few of his or her office hours to truly understand the concepts and what they want you to write on the exams, you'll be fine.

Doing the readings are not absolutely mandatory to pass the class, but they are very interesting and probably the only way to ensure an A (unless you're already well versed in Afro-American history). Overall this was a good class and not hard, but not too easy.

Course not listed Submitted March 7, 2007 Grade Received: N/A

I have to disagree with the reviews below. Scot Brown's lectures were well prepared and were very dynamic. The reading for the course well suited the material and was very engaging and interesting. As a class we read "The Musical and Social Journey of Horace Tapscott," "The Autobiography of James Brown," and "Funk." The reading for the course I would argue was the biggest challenge in the course. In addition to the three texts there was a number of lengthy articles available on line in PDF files. I wasn't able to get through all the reading. Actually, I did about half of the required reading.

The course was split 50/50 for grading. 50% for the Midterm and 50% for the Final.

The Midterm:
There were a number of students who took his recommendations for the Midterm too seriously. He recommended that answers be limited to a couple of sentences for the sake of grading, but also did not restrict of downgrade for students who decided to write more than recommended. Those who took his requests literally received C's and even D's on the Midterm for doing so and not being able to explain the material. I was one of the students who wrote all I needed to get my point across. By doing so I was awarded with a juicy A+.

The Final:
The final was a 6-8 page paper on the conceptualization of "The Underground," relating the course material and largely to "The Musical and Social Journey of Horace Tapscott." The topic allows you to freely explore your own ideas related to "The Underground," and encourages you to draw from course readings and lectures. Again, I was awarded with a nice A+.

Brown's courses are not difficult, you need to go in willing to do a substantial amount of reading, and go to all lectures. The rest is up to you.

The only negative critique I have of Professor Brown is that he was often times late to lecture, leaving the class hanging from 10-15 minutes at a time. He can be forgetful.

Course not listed Submitted Dec. 9, 2006 Grade Received: N/A

I basically feel the same way the person 5 or 6 comments below me feels.

"I can't understand the great reviews this professor is receiving. Yeah, he's a great guy. Most professors are. But Dr. Brown has serious weaknesses. First, his lectures. Either he doesn't prepare which is inexcusable or he doesn't know the material which is pretty sad but either way, his lecture style is chaotic at best, non-sensical at worst. I dare anyone to try to follow the thread of what this guy is talking about. It can't be done. If Brown isn't rehearsing his lectures before class begins, he should start. Even when he does come up with original thoughts, he's speaking so 'off the cuff' that it's damn hard to follow. Truthfully, it makes for a very boring class. Second, his exams. He only gives a midterm and it's way, way too easy. Now, some might disagree here--some students like the easy 'A' grade. Not me. I want an exam that will separate those students who study and can think critically on the material as opposed to those who don't listen to lectures and just memorized flash cards. A disorganized and uninformed lecturer with easy tests and TA discussions that are superfluous. I think Brown needs to sacrifice the 'good guy' comments and be a lot more challenging. Some suggestions might be to quiz the students in every discussion group and use the class time for more intense Q & A. If he doesn't get answers to his questions, he should assume the students aren't reading the material and act accordingly--quiz them on the spot or let the TA know that he can feel free to make the next quiz more challenging. The alternative to quizzes would be to have more dynamic lectures but that would require more preparation than what Brown appears to be willing to give. Maybe I caught him in a bad quarter--that happens. But am I alone in my view that the biggest problem with the Afro-Am department is that the bar is just not high enough? Well, it should be higher. The material being covered in all of the classes, not just Dr. Brown's, is terribly important but if the professors aren't interested in making damn sure we learn the stuff, we won't learn it. And the only way to separate those who want to learn from those whoh are just there is to make the classes harder than they are. UCLA professors should provide intellectually stimulating lectures, exams that are fair but challenging and by the end of the quarter, we should feel that we got much more from the course above and beyond the assigned reading. He's a very good person but in Brown's class, if you read the texts and never heard a word he said in lecture, you wouldn't miss a beat."

Course not listed Submitted Dec. 3, 2004 Grade Received: N/A

Professor Brown is a great professor who cares deeply about the content he teaches. Do not however mistaken him for an easy A. Hard work stil had to be put in to get an A, but if you do so, you will come out of his classes with more than just a school education - you will have grown in life.

Course not listed Submitted Sept. 19, 2004 Grade Received: N/A

Prof Browm is awesome simply put, he has a great emphasis on contemporary black history and its upcomings. Moreover, his ta's do a good job to get the students involved both within and outside of class. I recommend him, its not a given A, but if you do the hard you can do well.

HIST 197 Submitted July 7, 2004 Grade Received: N/A

Dr. Brown is absolutely brilliant. He's very nice and he's very concerned about student learning. I took a seminar with him about Black History and it was so fascinating that the discussions were never dry. We watched videos and read a few books, and wrote a couple papers.

The reading materials for his class are very well selected. They are engaging to read, and even more fun to discuss.

Of course, the real concern is whether he's an "easy" professor and the answer is YES! Not only are his classes easy, but you ACTUALLY learn a LOT! I would recommend his classes to anyone, even if (like me) you have absolutely NO background in black history.

Course not listed Submitted June 18, 2004 Grade Received: N/A

Everyone else's critiques are long so I'll keep mine short. This class is awsome as well as the teacher! Take this course! You won't regret it.

Course not listed Submitted May 15, 2004 Grade Received: N/A

I can't explain the great reviews this professor is receiving. Yeah, he's a great guy. Most professors are. But Dr. Brown has serious weaknesses.

First, his lectures. Either he doesn't prepare which is inexcusable or he doesn't know the material which is pretty sad but either way, his lecture style is chaotic at best, non-sensical at worst. I dare anyone to try to follow the thread of what this guy is talking about. It can't be done. If Brown isn't rehearsing his lectures before class begins, he should start. Even when he does come up with original thoughts, he's speaking so 'off the cuff' that it's damn hard to follow. Truthfully, it makes for a very boring class.

Second, his exams. He only gives a midterm and it's way, way too easy. Now, some might disagree here--some students like the easy 'A' grade. Not me. I want an exam that will separate those students who study and can think critically on the material as opposed to those who don't listen to lectures and just memorized flash cards.

Third, the discussion section is led by a TA, another great guy. Except for midterm review, they are a waste of time.

So what do you have? A disorganized and uninformed lecturer with easy tests and TA discussions that are superfluous.

I think Brown needs to sacrifice the 'good guy' comments and be a lot more challenging. Some suggestions might be to quiz the students in every discussion group and use the class time for more intense Q & A. If he doesn't get answers to his questions, he should assume the students aren't reading the material and act accordingly--quiz them on the spot or let the TA know that he can feel free to make the next quiz more challenging.

The alternative to quizzes would be to have more dynamic lectures but that would require more preparation than what Brown appears to be willing to give.

Maybe I caught him in a bad quarter--that happens. But am I alone in my view that the biggest problem with the Afro-Am department is that the bar is just not high enough? Well, it should be higher. The material being covered in all of the classes, not just Dr. Brown's, is terribly important but if the professors aren't interested in making damn sure we learn the stuff, we won't learn it. And the only way to separate those who want to learn from those whoh are just there is to make the classes harder than they are.

UCLA professors should provide intellectually stimulating lectures, exams that are fair but challenging and by the end of the quarter, we should feel that we got much more from the course above and beyond the assigned reading.

He's a very good person but in Brown's class, if you read the texts and never heard a word he said in lecture, you wouldn't miss a beat. That's the educational experience one expects in a junior college, not at UCLA.

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