Brent Corbin
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Brent Corbin

corbin@physics.ucla.edu

http://www.physics.ucla.edu/~corbin/

1-707M PAB

310-267-4686

Rating

Not Effective
8.83
Very Effective
Very Hard
1.51
Very Easy
Not Concerned
9.03
Very Concerned
Not Available
9.12
Very Available
Not Good Overall
8.54
Very Good Overall

Grade history

PEERS Collaborative Learning Workshops for Physical Sciences and Engineering Majors

Physics: 98XB - Spring 2010

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Pass: 27 ~ No Pass: 2 ~ Satisfactory: 0 ~ Unsatisfactory: 0 ~ Incomplete: 0

PEERS Collaborative Learning Workshops for Life Sciences Majors

Physics: 98XA - Spring 2010

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Pass: 9 ~ No Pass: 1 ~ Satisfactory: 0 ~ Unsatisfactory: 0 ~ Incomplete: 0

Physics for Scientists and Engineers: Oscillations, Waves, Electric and Magnetic Fields

Physics: 1B - Spring 2010

A+
1.6%
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26.9%
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1.6%
B+
3.1%
B
30.6%
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3.1%
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20.2%
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Pass: 1 ~ No Pass: 0 ~ Satisfactory: 0 ~ Unsatisfactory: 0 ~ Incomplete: 0

Physics for Scientists and Engineers: Electrodynamics, Optics, and Special Relativity

Physics: 1C - Winter 2010

A+
1.7%
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28.6%
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3.4%
B
31.9%
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4.2%
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15.1%
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3.4%

Pass: 0 ~ No Pass: 0 ~ Satisfactory: 0 ~ Unsatisfactory: 0 ~ Incomplete: 0

Physics for Life Sciences Majors: Light, Fluids, Thermodynamics, Modern Physics

Physics: 6C - Fall 2009

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25.8%
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6.5%
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24.7%
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8.6%
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18.3%
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1.1%

Pass: 0 ~ No Pass: 0 ~ Satisfactory: 0 ~ Unsatisfactory: 0 ~ Incomplete: 0

Physics: 91A - Spring 2006

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Pass: 30 ~ No Pass: 1 ~ Satisfactory: 0 ~ Unsatisfactory: 0 ~ Incomplete: 0

Physics for Scientists and Engineers: Mechanics

Physics: 1A - Spring 2006

A+
1.4%
A
29.7%
A-
1.4%
B+
4.1%
B
25.5%
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4.8%
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4.8%
C
23.4%
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4.1%
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0.0%
D
0.0%
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0.0%
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0.7%

Pass: 0 ~ No Pass: 0 ~ Satisfactory: 0 ~ Unsatisfactory: 0 ~ Incomplete: 1

Evaluations

Posted 10/14/2014
Course(s) taken: Physics: 1C

This is quite late, but I took 1B and 1C with him last year and his 1B course is a big part of why I decided to do a second major in physics (my first major is in an unrelated field that's often laughed at by physics majors.)

Anyway, he's without a doubt the best professor I've ever had. I'm not very good at explaining why/how, but he simply excels at teaching. Go to one of his lectures, and you'll understand.

I did well in 1B despite being positive that I'd failed the class. I slacked a bit in 1C and bombed the final after pulling three all-nighters in a row (bad, bad idea, sleep is very important for your brain) but I still learned so much in those two classes and am very glad that I took them with him.

If you're not a physics/math/engineering major, are not interested in physics as a subject, and only care about getting an easy A, I suppose you're better off taking one of the other professors (try Zocchi). However, if you have even the slightest interest in actually learning the material, take him. If you're a physics major, how well you do in his course is a good indicator of how well you'll do in subsequent upper division classes. He approaches physics from a theory-based perspective rather than focusing on regurgitative plug-and-chug, so you'll have a far easier time in upper-div courses if you take the 1 series with him.

Also, his classes are not as difficult as people make them out to be. Yes, his exam averages are low, but once you get past the shock of receiving a 40% on a midterm, that's really irrelevant - what matters is a) how well you do relative to the class average and b) how well you learn the material regardless of your numerical score.

Posted 07/10/2014
Course(s) taken: Physics: 1A

By far the funniest lecturer I have ever had. He definitely makes physics very interesting and motivates people to learn physics for fun, and not as a chore. That being said, his midterms and final were the hardest tests I have ever taken, and if it weren't for his generous grading and partial credit, everyone would fail his class. Go to the lectures and office hours if you can, do lots of practice problems and an A is not impossible.

Posted 06/18/2014
Course(s) taken: Physics: 1C

Corbin is the best professor I've had in my two years at UCLA. He legitimately cares if his students learn the material and he really prepares you for upper division classes.

His lectures are all proofs so they're really hard to follow. Make sure you copy everything down in your notes and go over them later.

His tests are really really hard. Do all of your homework and do additional problems in the book and you'll have a chance. But in the end, he's really generous with the number of A's he gives out.

Posted 03/17/2014
Course(s) taken: Physics: 1C

I'm going to start off by saying Corbin is a good professor. Is he great? I personally didn't think so. His lectures can be a bit hard to follow even if you are pretty good at physics. He definitely caters to students who really like physics and consider themselves to really understand it.

Nonetheless, you do learn a lot in this class. The way the class is structured forces you to keep on top of the material and really know it, not just memorize equations.

The first midterm was ok, time is a really big constraint though. The second midterm was pretty difficult and I was scared going into the final, but I got a B in the class. The grading is fairly generous in terms of the number of B's given out. It is very hard to get an A but not too hard to get a B.

Posted 12/20/2013
Course(s) taken: Physics: 1C

By the time you take Corbin, you will have heard how hard he is and how great of a professor he is. While both of these are mostly true, there is a little more to it than this.

Though his final and midterm scores are extremely low, the tests themselves aren't as hard as they seem. The main problem on the midterm is time. The problems are pretty predictable, and even if you miss all of the challenging parts you can still score way above the average because most people freak out for these tests and neglect to study the basics. If you don't waste time on what you don't know and think carefully before attempting each part then time is the only thing holding you back. This means practicing many problems is key so that you can recognize what to do quickly. The final gives you a lot more time per problem, but there is also a LOT of material that is fair game. If you have kept up with the material all quarter long then you should be fine. The questions themselves are much easier than the midterms if you studied the right things.

He is a great professor for many people, but not all like the comments seem to make you think. If you are someone who understands physics and math pretty well, then Corbin is about as good as you can get. If you don't have a very strong background in physics and math, then you will often get lost in his lectures. If you just write everything down and go back and look at your notes after you have practiced some problems, then things will go more smoothly. But if you are still having trouble then each lecture will get more and more confusing because his lectures really do build upon one another. And his office hours are apparently great, but good luck getting one-on-one attention if you need it.

If you are good and physics and want to become great then this is the guy for you. If you are shaky at physics and want to get better, then there are probably better options, unless you have a very good TA. Also, he often lets it be known how bad most textbooks (including the one for the class) are, but the practice problems and the simplified explanations actually complement his notes perfectly, in my opinion. Also, he makes it sound like the notes that you take are the key to doing well, but often other explanations can help make things make sense too. So, while he is a GREAT teacher, he's not quite as immortal as he wants to come off as.

Bottom line: Don't let him intimidate you. You'll hear many stories about how hard and scary he is, but he gives more A's than any other lower division physics professor, makes very useful notes to help summarize what he does in class, doesn't collect homework (but still gives suggested problems), gives a TON of partial credit, gives very predictable tests, and considers all of the test in you grade, so one bad test won't hurt you much at all.

In short: take him if you like physics and are at least moderately good at it, and don't take him if you struggle, as you will fall through the cracks. I learned to love physics even more than I did, and I got an A without going to any office hours or doing a ton of homework, but the experience is different for everyone, so, while he is a great professor, he isn't for everyone.

Posted 12/20/2013
Course(s) taken: Physics: 1C

By the time you take Corbin, you will have heard how hard he is and how great of a professor he is. While both of these are mostly true, there is a little more to it than this.

Though his final and midterm scores are extremely low, the tests themselves aren't as hard as they seem. The main problem on the midterm is time. The problems are pretty predictable, and even if you miss all of the challenging parts you can still score way above the average because most people freak out for these tests and neglect to study the basics. If you don't waste time on what you don't know and think carefully before attempting each part then time is the only thing holding you back. This means practicing many problems is key so that you can recognize what to do quickly. The final gives you a lot more time per problem, but there is also a LOT of material that is fair game. If you have kept up with the material all quarter long then you should be fine. The questions themselves are much easier than the midterms if you studied the right things.

He is a great professor for many people, but not all like the comments seem to make you think. If you are someone who understands physics and math pretty well, then Corbin is about as good as you can get. If you don't have a very strong background in physics and math, then you will often get lost in his lectures. If you just write everything down and go back and look at your notes after you have practiced some problems, then things will go more smoothly. But if you are still having trouble then each lecture will get more and more confusing because his lectures really do build upon one another. And his office hours are apparently great, but good luck getting one-on-one attention if you need it.

If you are good and physics and want to become great then this is the guy for you. If you are shaky at physics and want to get better, then there are probably better options, unless you have a very good TA. Also, he often lets it be known how bad most textbooks (including the one for the class) are, but the practice problems and the simplified explanations actually complement his notes perfectly, in my opinion. Also, he makes it sound like the notes that you take are the key to doing well, but often other explanations can help make things make sense too. So, while he is a GREAT teacher, he's not quite as immortal as he wants to come off as.

Bottom line: Don't let him intimidate you. You'll hear many stories about how hard and scary he is, but he gives more A's than any other lower division physics professor, makes very useful notes to help summarize what he does in class, doesn't collect homework (but still gives suggested problems), gives a TON of partial credit, gives very predictable tests, and considers all of the test in you grade, so one bad test won't hurt you much at all.

In short: take him if you like physics and are at least moderately good at it, and don't take him if you struggle, as you will fall through the cracks. I learned to love physics even more than I did, and I got an A without going to any office hours or doing a ton of homework, but the experience is different for everyone, so, while he is a great professor, he isn't for everyone.

Posted 12/19/2013
Course(s) taken: Physics: 1C

I decided to take corbin b/c he has such great reviews from others saying he's the best professor and super entertaining. Sure, he's entertaining and a darn good professor, but I also feel like he's overhyped a bit? Maybe it's cuz physics isn't my strongest subject, but I just barely understood what he was talking about while he was talking about it. Corbin assumes that you remember a LOT of stuff from 1A and 1B, and cuz of that, he jumps around a lot in what he writes down on the board, assuming that you can figure it out yourself. Granted, I guess I should've remembered that or could look it up on my own.. his teaching style was just very different and hard to get used to.

He doesn't do his lectures with notes (just uses his brain) and he DOES write a lot of useless stuff on the board. However, it's hard to determine (personally) what's useless or not at the time, so I just write everything down.

Tests are all DOABLE. It's just that I couldn't do it at the time. 1st midterm --3 problems-- averaged 40ish/90. Second midterm --3 problems-- averaged 30ish/90. Final average dunno; was 6 problems long.

I never went to office hours... probably should have but always had class during his office hours. He holds them 4 times a week, very generous! Heard it's usually full..

Yes, study a lot if you want to succeed. If you get average or below overage on the midterms you can still pull through on the final...

Posted 12/19/2013
Course(s) taken: Physics: 1C

I'm writing this review at 2:30 am during my winter break because I'm so worried that I might have failed his 1C final I can't sleep.

I liked Corbin. He was funny, made physics interesting, and I would describe him as a good teacher. He didn't flunk me for 1b so I thought I'd take him for 1c too.

However, I can't seem to succeed in his class. I took all the advice that everyone gives to his students. I made a good set of notes, went to office hours, utilized the tau beta pi tutoring, and did all the homework problems. I put more work into this class than my other (more difficult) EE and CS classes combined.

So I don't know what to think. Corbin, if you're browsing bruin walk for laughs or an ego boost over your break, please don't fail very many students in your 1c class this fall. Because one of them probably didn't do the worst but didn't master the material either. And their Christmas will be ruined if you flunk them.

Posted 09/19/2013
Course(s) taken: Physics: 1B

Seriously one of the best professors I've ever had. Genuinely interested in student learning and very approachable. Make sure you go to his office hours.

Posted 06/25/2013
Course(s) taken: Physics: 1B

This man is the best physics professor I ever met, and I am glad to see every review on this page so far agrees with me.

I took Corbin after having inadvertently sat through his 1B lecture by mistake during Winter (when I was still in 1A), and realizing he was the man I wanted for 1B. Why? Well, for a start, his lectures are phenomenal. That's a bland qualifier, though, so let me be more specific: this man is not afraid of using his head. He does not shy away from mathematics proper (something I have seen far too many otherwise well-meaning professors do, not realizing just how detrimental it is in the long run), and does not believe that a physicist is a human calculator (something I gladly welcome; physics is not arithmetic or ridiculous computation, and anybody who thinks it is is severely mistaken).

In that vein, you will rarely, if ever, see him perform a calculation. What Corbin specializes in, and what makes him superior to many other professors, are derivations. Nor will these be ordinary derivations. For his final lecture in Spring, Corbin went so far as to derive the exact rate of precession for a charged sphere oscillating at an angular velocity around its axis in a magnetic field (which sounds complicated at first, but Corbin roots it completely in everything you've learnt over the quarter, so that when you see it, you'll kick yourself for not having thought of it sooner.)

Here's a list of what makes his classes unique:

1) He knows more than the book. He is not one of those professors who copies things wholesale from the text and proceeds to do exactly what's in it. Corbin teaches upper divs as well as graduate classes, and in his younger days worked at FermiLab, only the world's premier particle physics institute after CERN, and he brings all that knowledge to bear on the 1 series. He will correct the book on several occasions, teach you advanced stuff, and he will - I promise you this - make you like it, in part because he can actually make you understand and use it by yourself without too much help.

2) Corbin advocates self-sufficiency. He is one of those teachers who will go well and beyond the call of duty to make sure you understand what you're doing (he once let a struggling student actually bunk in his office in the days before the final to avoid distractions from studying), but his main intent and goal is to get you to the point where you could surpass even him. When discussing how to prepare for his midterms, he will ask you to go over your notes, and derive the equations firsthand for yourself. (I went even further, and came up with my own problems - it's really good practice, and will help you loads). He believes in this so much he even made the homework strictly optional: a lot of hard questions, and they're all upto you to do them - Corbin will grade you on the finals and the midterms only. Corbin also believes mathematics was invented for physics, and so it's physical intuition you need to hone - understand what's going on, and the math will work itself out, is what he always says.

3) Corbin is not, contrary to what everybody on this page claims, hard. If you actually go through his old midterms, you will be a little surprised to find they are all actually pretty straightforward - a standard Corbin problem merits no more than three lines of a solution (and if you think I'm joking, the solutions he hands out actually are just that long - that they also make complete sense simultaneously is simply proof that the difficulty of Corbin's problems are exaggerated).

What makes Corbin legendary for his midterms are a combination of factors: the time limit (fifty minutes is just not enough to solve three Corbin questions), the fact that they test more than one concept (including quite a bit of your math - Corbin is particularly fond of Taylor series, and will have you employ them where you can), that he likes pushing you into unfamiliar ground (on his final, he asked us about semiconductor devices, something which we had never covered) while making you realise just how much of it is actually familiar (on the same question, he asked us nothing about semiconductors, but only gave us certain properties and asked us to work out directly from these properties the effect it would have on the rest of the circuit), and finally, that they're just completely new. It takes skill to solve a completely new problem, one you couldn't have imagined in your wildest dreams, in just fifty minutes. By way of comparison, if all you've ever learned is Euclidean geometry and trigonometry, you're going to have no clue what to do when you have to solve for things on the surface of a sphere, even though everything about such a problem can be solved using Euclidean geometry and trigonometry (no joke, that's how Carl Gauss, the greatest mathematician who ever lived, did it at the tender age of sixteen). Simply put, Corbin is different, not hard, and won't have you go through the material you've already covered and memorized and could do in your sleep if he can help it.

4) Corbin is awesome at teaching. There simply is no other way to put it. Corbin is a man who likes stories, and for his part is an incredibly talented raconteur: no class goes by without him at least once bursting into some episode from his life that will make you laugh, and simultaneously cherish what he's teaching you. He makes those equations come to life, mainly because he is quite literally deriving them right there (no notes, occasionally from memory, but mostly just making things up as he goes along), and by telling you these amazing stories about the objects his equations describe that will make you in parts gasp, flinch and simply be left spellbound. There is magic to these objects, not rote - a certain splendor and sheer grandeur that many other professors seem to leave out. For this one ability alone, I rank Corbin above every teacher you might possibly meet in the Physics department.

5) He cares about his students. He is one of the few professors who holds office hours four out of five days of the week, responds to every email promptly and with incredible detail, tries to get to know them all, will never short-serve you on information, and will always, always, respond to your questions. Speak up in his classes; it's good for you.

6) His demo days are epic. Do not miss a single one: he showcases really cool stuff, and will do things you thought they only did in Hollywood.

7) Office hours are special. You can ask for help on homework problems if you want, but he likes using them to go beyond the stuff in the classroom. Expect to see problems beyond the standard of the textbook, and sometimes several days ahead of his own lectures. Also, pipe up with good questions.

And that's really all you need to know. Your only problem may be that Corbin is immensely popular - lines stretch from his office to the entrance of the building sometimes, and his office hours are packed with people, making it hard to get a one-on-one session with him. He also knows when he has a really good TA with him. This TA will be your lifeline. Also, he - rarely, but still there - makes statements that sound confusing and mystical ('Energy is conserved, except when it's not!'), and - still more rarely, but nevertheless - this can get in the way of seeing what he means, for a short while. Lastly, Corbin is a ribald man: don't be put off if he curses or describes how he comes to create midterm problems in a haze of drunken bleariness. That's just the way he is: a man of personality.

Posted 03/26/2013
Course(s) taken: Physics: 1A

I took Physics 1A, 1B, and 1C with Professor Corbin. If I hadn't, my first two years at UCLA would have been much worse. Not only is Professor Corbin an excellent lecturer, he has a way of making 200-person lower-div physics classes seem very small (this is especially due to his tight-knit office hours groups). In short, take Corbin. He actually is not that hard (that is, if you do problems in multiple books and go to office hours frequently) and you will leave his class a better thinker (and I got A's in 1A and 1B and am expecting an A in 1C, so it definitely is possible!)

Posted 12/23/2012
Course(s) taken: Physics: 1B

I had Corbin for 1A, 1B, and 1C. He's easily one of the best instructors I've ever had at UCLA.

Take Corbin if you REALLY want to learn physics. If you're looking for an easy A that can be obtained by memorizing a ton of equations and spitting them out on a test, then you should look elsewhere.

His tests tend to have low averages, but they really test if you know the material well or not. They tend to test deeper concepts, instead of just facts or simplistic examples. For instance, his lecture might discuss a simple mass on a spring for oscillations. The homework might ask about two springs attached to a mass. While his exam will go the next step, and ask about the movement of charge in an RLC circuit. While initially one would think that a circuit has nothing to do with mass and springs, upon further analysis the charge is oscillating in the circuit.

His lectures are pretty good. He's reasonably entertaining; he makes a few puns here and there with varying humor rating. He introduces the material in a pretty logical fashion and he's pretty enthusiastic about the material. But most importantly he actually does the derivations on the spot. (Although occasionally he refers to his notes). He'll describe his thought processes out loud which makes it easier to understand what an equation actually means. Other instructors I've had do some textbook-like derivation with some lame examples that don't really give a good taste what an equation means, and what it can do.

He's got OH 4 times a week if you are confused. They're pretty helpful, as he'll try and sort out misconceptions you may have, and he'll also give out some other cool examples that are actually pretty interesting/pragmatic. Corbin is also pretty chill by nature, so it shouldn't be too difficult to ask him questions. Even if it's really really stupid (read: trivial), because I've asked him a boatload of "stupid" questions.

If you're an EE, you should really take this guy's 1B course. It'll actually teach you electrostatics pretty damn well if you put the time and effort into it. So much so, that EE1 becomes a "joke" compared to 1B.


As far as grades go, Corbin is one of the more difficult instructors at UCLA, but he's also not draconic in his grading policy. He's pretty fair, and understands that sometimes people have crappy testing days. He does give a reasonable amount of As/Bs out (and not too many Cs and lower). As long as you're doing 1 standard deviation+ on all the exams, you should be in the range for an A. (Don't quote me on that). The Final Exam counts the most for the class- if you haven't been doing well on the midterms, then you should be prepping yourself to murder the Final as even with poor midterm scores you can still get an A.

For reference, I managed to get an A in 1A,B,C and I can assure you that I'm not the sharpest tool in the shed haha. (Although I think I was lucky in 1C) So it IS possible!

TL;DR
Classic dilemma that a college student faces: do I want an easy A, or do I actually want to learn the material? If you really want to learn, but still want a decent chance at an A (it's not really free) then take Corbin.

Also, for entertainment purposes, you should ask him about the Color Conspiracy of Muppets.

Posted 07/27/2012
Course(s) taken: Physics: 1B

Take him, take him, take him. I had Corbin for 1A and 1B, and he's easily one of the best teachers I've ever had. Yes, his class is hard. Yes, his tests regularly have averages in the ballpark of 30/90. But you should still take his class. Why? You'll learn. Corbin forces you to actually learn physics, so memorizing formulas and plug-and-chugging won't get you anywhere. He'll help you figure out how to approach problems, and how to really think about the concepts behind what you're doing.

Choosing whether or not to enroll in Corbin's class really boils down to why you're in college. Are you here to take easy classes and get straight A's, or are you here to challenge yourself to the point where you can get the most out of your time here? That was a shamelessly condescending question, but that's how I see it. I don't have the greatest grades, but I've made sure to take some of the best teachers I can at UCLA. And honestly, if you put the time into this class, you can definitely get an A. I didn't study as much as I should have because I focused on other classes, and I got a B in 1A, and a B+ in 1B.

On a completely unrelated-to-grades note, Corbin is super chill and nice, looks like Jeff Bridges, and would be a great person to drink whiskey with if the legal drinking age was 18.

Posted 07/20/2012
Course(s) taken: Physics: 1A

Professor Corbin is easily the best professor that I have had thus far at UCLA. I have taken Physics 1A and 1B with him, and I will be taking Physics 1C with him in the Fall. I will be entering my Sophomore, and from what I have heard about my future professors, Corbin will eclipse all of them.
DO NOT listen to the people who say that he is intentionally trying to screw people over in terms of grades. Those people obviously never went to his office hours (which he has nearly every day). He genuinely cares about our education, and I find that to be the best quality a professor can ever have.
I'm not saying this because I have gotten an A in both of the first two classes with him. I am a C and B student, trust me. I just think that the value of the education I receive from Corbin is better than what I would get from anybody else.
I'm not going to lie to you, his tests are really hard. And when I say hard, I mean the average is usually around 30-40%. But don't think of that as a reason not to take him. He is making sure that you understand the material more than just merely memorizing the equations. He wants you to be "fluent", not "familiar".
Definitely take Corbin. It will make your education experience better here. And everyone can take a slight hit to their GPA, even though it is definitely possible to get a B or maybe an A in his class.

Posted 12/11/2011
Course(s) taken: Physics: 6A

Brent corbin YT review
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RtZcYDpphSE

Posted 12/07/2011
Course(s) taken: Physics: 1C

Took 1B and 1C.

Corbin is easily the best professor I had so far as a sophomore. Paces his lectures extremely well. Enlightening lectures, to the point that the book is not necessary apart from getting homework problems.

Sure he might make harder exams than other professors do, but you will never encounter anything we didn't talk about at class. And you learn more anyway. And also, look at the grade distribution. FREAKING 30% A's. What more do you want? I was so scared coming into his class, but Corbin gave me my only A in UCLA so far..

He has office hours everyday = win.

He's a cool guy too. Keeps me entertained in class; cusses, makes dirty jokes, etc etc. His class in one class that I never fall asleep in.

IGNORE THOSE COMMENTS THAT SCARE YOU OFF. TAKE CORBIN.

Posted 11/16/2011
Course(s) taken: Physics: 1A

My brother is a freshman and he just told me that corbin's class was the first physics 1A class to be completely filled. I couldn't believe that it wasn't Holczer's class ... his class is so easy . Its open book, and his midterms and finale is from his homework. You do the homework and you're almost guaranteed an A. I took 91A with corbin and it was the worst class I ever took in UCLA, his lectures are way too difficult.

Posted 10/11/2011
Course(s) taken: Physics: 1C

Sounds like Jeff Bridges

Posted 09/17/2011
Course(s) taken: Physics: 1B

Corbin is an amazing professor who actually teaches you the material and makes you think about how to solve a problem, as opposed to other professors who give you problems straight out of the textbook. Yes, his tests will make you feel like you failed miserably, but don't worry, he gives A LOT of partial credit and curves massively. I scored 1 standard deviation above average on every test and ended up with an A.

Posted 07/14/2011
Course(s) taken: Physics: 1A

this class isnt hard if youve taken ap physics b (or ap physics c mechanics i would imagine but i guess you would have passed out of it). basically its mechanics so moving stuff but with a little calculus involved and some rotational stuff. i can say that i learned very little because i already knew most of it. lecture is 4 times a week and theres a discussion so this class will get very boring over time. midterms and final are all conceptual so not numbers involved. on each of his midterm there is one homework problem on it. i got burned out over the homework so i recommend just looking at the answers