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UCLA Department of Classics

http://www.humnet.ucla.edu/humnet/classics/index.h...

College of Letters and Science

CLASSIC

Description

UCLA DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICS

The UCLA Department of Classics, with more than 200 courses spread across four undergraduate Bachelor's Degrees is one of the top ten doctoral classics programs in the most recent National Research Council rankings.

With more than 2,500 undergraduates enrolling in the department's courses every year, The Department of Classics acts as a highly interdisciplinary program, with courses co-listed with and co-taught by faculty from Art History, Comparative Literature, English, History, Art and Near Eastern Language and Culture.

For undergraduates, the Department of Classics allows students to major in Greek, Latin, Greek & Latin, or Classical Civilization, which revamped its requirements for students enrolling after the spring 2010 quarter. Minors are also offered in Classical Civilization, Latin and Greek.

While the major options differ in their ancient history, art and language requirements, one requisite course for all Bachelor's Degrees within the Department of Classics is the Capstone Seminar (Classics 191), a quarter-long intensive and focused research experience for juniors and seniors in the program. The seminars, which are offered in the Fall and Winter, allow faculty to create curriculums in their areas of expertise. Past examples of the Capstone Seminar include " The Immortal Experience" taught by Alex Purves in Winter 2009 and "Image & Text," taught by John Papadopoulos in fall 2010.

For graduate students within the Department of Classics, the department offers a Master of Arts, Master of Arts degree in Latin, Master of Arts degree in Greek, Candidate in Philosophy, and Doctor of Philosophy degree.

As a whole the UCLA Department of Classics also provides a number of services and opportunities to enrolled students and the UCLA community. Since 1992, for example, the department has sponsored the Classical Society, which allows students from all academic backgrounds to partake in classic gatherings and trips, and also gives them access to counseling mentors who provide advice on moving forward within the field of classics.

The Department of Classics also sponsors a number of lectures and series geared towards further classical education and research. Within the 2010-2011 academic year the department sponsored such lectures as "Iconoclasm as Discourse: From Antiquity to Byzantium," "Portrait of the Artist in Sympotic Context or Smikros RIP," and "Sexual Warfare against Girls and Women in Classical Antiquity."

A biennial graduate student conference, "That's What She Said," focuses on women in antiquity, and their voices through both literary and material sources. The Department of Classics hosted the third conference in November 2010.

The Department's current chair is David Blank, who also serves as the director of the department's Philodemus Project, an international effort to reconstruct new texts of Philodemus' works discovered in a 1752 excavation of Pompeii.

Courses

Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 10 or 40W. Investigation of specific issue in understanding of Greek literature, such as definition of one genre or evaluation of particular author. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

(Same as Political Science M112B.) Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Democracy was invented in ancient Greece. Political form grounded on equality before law, citizenship, and freedom, it came into existence as struggle by "demos," people, aware of its excellence and proud of its power, "kratos." It became only regime capable of including all members of community while disregarding wealth, status, and diverging interests. Examination of history and theory of ancient democracy. P/NP or letter grading.

Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 20. Focused study of one aspect of ancient Greek or Roman culture or reception of classical tradition. Topics are interdisciplinary in nature (literature, arts, religion, politics, culture) and make connections between ancient and postclassical eras. Topics include rediscovery of Pompeii and Herculaneum; Roman religion and literature; pleasures of Greek or Roman body; and 18th-century British literature and reception of classics. P/NP or letter grading.

Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 20. Focused study of one aspect of ancient Greek or Roman culture or reception of classical tradition. Topics are interdisciplinary in nature (literature, arts, religion, politics, culture) and make connections between ancient and postclassical eras. P/NP or letter grading.

Seminar, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to lower division lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Exploration in detail and from variety of critical perspectives of carefully selected set of literary texts characteristic of ancient Rome and significant in Western literary tradition. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

Seminar, three hours. Studies in style and iconography of various periods of Aegean, Greek, and Roman painting. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. S/U or letter grading.

Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 10 or 20. Survey of comedy as it developed in Greek and Roman worlds. P/NP or letter grading.

Lecture, three hours. Requisite: one course from 10, 20, 30, 40W, or 41W. Homer's "Iliad" and "Odyssey," Vergil's "Aeneid," and Ovid's "Metamorphoses," studied in translation. P/NP or letter grading.

Professors

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